The Outdated Libertarian Zealotry of Kimberly Fiorello

In Fiorello’s eyes, government is overarching and unaccountable.

Anyone who receives Representative Kimberly Fiorello’s Capitol Update knows that when faced with how to vote on a proposed bill, Fiorello is guided by two questions: first, will this bill enhance individual freedoms or diminish them? And second, will this bill empower government or weaken it?

GREENWICH LIBRARY STEPPED UP AND DELIVERED

“Protesting is never a disturbance of peace. Corruption, injustice, war and intimidation are disturbances of peace.” Bryant McGill

Deep in the pandemic last summer, I was moved by the bold, courageous efforts of the Greenwich Public Library, taking a stand against racism and facilitating its vast resources to educate our community. They hosted virtual events, and curated book lists for every age group to inform and encourage dialog and actions for a reimagined future of true equality.

Rep. Fiorello remarks on anti-discrimination legislation. She said what?

“I don’t know how you legislate equality” asserted Rep. Kimberly Fiorello at a recent meeting of the Judiciary Committee. “WTF?” answered the Founding Fathers

“I don’t know how you legislate equality” asserted Rep. Kimberly Fiorello at a recent meeting of the Judiciary Committee. Republican Fiorello was elected last fall to fill the 149th district Assembly seat vacated by retiring state legislator Livvy Floren, at the time considered the most moderate Republican in the CT General Assembly (though her voting record was anything but progressive).

Commenting on language in the bill to legalize marijuana that includes remedying and preventing inequity and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, Rep. Fiorello claimed, “bills can’t do this; it’s not possible.”

What is Greenwich’s “Character”?

What our actions have said is, “We want other towns to house the people that we need to keep our town and our state healthy.”

I am disappointed to hear the wild doomsday predictions and mischaracterizations from some of our Greenwich elected officials regarding Connecticut Senate Bill 1024 (specifically First Selectman Camillo, Rep. Fiorello, and Rep. Arora). This bill, which addresses our state-wide housing and affordability crisis, will not upend our town’s character.  Rather, it will nudge Greenwich to do what we claim in our own Plan of Conservation and Development (“POCD”) that we WANT to do: offer more diverse and affordable housing.  In fact, this bill will nudge Greenwich back toward the policies that it used to embrace and that created our vibrant town.  It will allow people like my older friends, who have lived in Greenwich for decades, to downsize and still stay in town.  It will allow my adult kids to think about returning to live in their hometown. The common-sense policies in the bill would enhance property values, protect the environment, make Connecticut towns competitive with other forward-looking towns, bring vibrancy to our downtown, and bring new tax-paying residents.

How Well Are Greenwich Community Needs Being Addressed?

The Greenwich United Way recently completed its Needs Assessment 2020, which is a community-wide assessment of the human service needs and assets, designed to help make data-informed actions for the public good.

The Greenwich United Way recently completed its Needs Assessment 2020, which is a community-wide assessment of the human service needs and assets, designed to help make data-informed actions for the public good. The Needs Assessment offers extensive data as well as analysis of where community needs and assets match well and where there is a gap.

A Brief History of Zoning in Greenwich: Part III

This is the third of three articles by Nicholas Abbott, on the history of zoning in Greenwich.

Zoning in Greenwich: Part III

Debates over residential zoning have taken center stage in Greenwich politics, sparking debate between supporters and detractors of statewide land use reforms proposed by Desegregate Connecticut.

A Brief History of Zoning in Greenwich: Part II

This is the second of three articles focused on the zoning policies of Greenwich.

Zoning in Greenwich: Part II

Debates over residential zoning have taken center stage in Greenwich politics, sparking debate between supporters and detractors of statewide land use reforms proposed by Desegregate Connecticut.

A Brief History of Zoning in Greenwich: Part I

This history reveals that Greenwich’s residential development was not merely the accident of individuals’ choices in the aggregate, but the product of conscious public policy decisions. This is the first of a three-part series from Nicholas Abbott.

Debates over residential zoning have taken center stage in Greenwich politics, sparking debate between supporters and detractors of statewide land use reforms proposed by Desegregate Connecticut.

The March RTM Call

The agenda, or “Call”, for the March 8, 2021 RTM meeting is comprised of 16 items affecting all areas of town governance. Those items are summarized below. To attend and participate in the full RTM meeting and the district and committee meetings, which are all public meetings.

The agenda, or “Call”, for the March 8, 2021 RTM meeting is comprised of 16 items affecting all areas of town governance.